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About Computer Science

Computer ScienceThe African University of Science and Technology (AUST) offers graduate level courses leading up to a Master of Science (MSc) degree in Computer Science. After successful completion of the program, students are expected to be fully equipped to pursue a PhD either at AUST under a program with participating institutions abroad or in any reputable university. The Computer Science MSc program at AUST provides the students with a strong background in the fundamentals of theory of computation, algorithms and data structures, programming methodology and languages, computer elements and architecture, numerical and symbolic computations and applications. In addition to the basic courses, students are introduced to important and recent research areas in Artificial Intelligence, visualization and High Performance Computing – HPC, Database and Information Systems, Architecture, Parallel Computing and Systems, as well as Scientific Computing.

The MSc program has an 18- month duration and consists of a combination of core courses electives and the preparation of a Master’s Thesis under the supervision of a faculty member. Students who complete the first year with a grade point average of C (GPA of 2.0) without any failing grade are awarded the AUST Post-Graduate Diploma in Computer Science. Students who in addition have maintained a B average (GPA of 3.0) throughout the year can then continue with the Master’s program in the second year.

The Computer Science program is very intensive and only well motivated and prepared students who want to excel in a career involving teaching and research are encouraged to apply. Courses are taught as 3- or 4- week modules of 45 to 60 hours. This includes lectures and problem solving sessions. The average number of modules for first- year students is about 16.

The curriculum covers a wide range of subjects. In the first year, students take fundamental courses covering programming, data structures, algorithms, software engineering, discrete math, digital logic, computer architecture, microcomputer systems and other topical courses. In the second year, students take up to six advanced modules covering some specific areas.